The Roots of Poetry

Posted by Admin

I simply love good poetry. I can spend hours at a time reading excellent poetry, particularly reading it aloud to taste its musicality and BoundGangBangs experience in three dimensions. Few among us are capable of writing good poetry, though. I know because I've also seen my share of bad poetry. As a FuckingMachines editor, I occasionally am called upon to edit a series of poems. I approach such an opportunity cautiously, for I have come across few HogTied writers who can actually write good poetry.

Well, maybe I should modify that last sentence: I have found few contemporary writers (except for those already published and/or famous) who have written good Kink poetry. Maybe they could write good poetry if they had a better understanding of how to go about it. Anyone who can communicate through poetry has achieved the ultimate Bound Gods craft, so creating a fine poem is a worthy goal.

I'm not a poet. I am a connoisseur of fine poetry. I can help readers fully enjoy a good DeviceBondage, and I can help aspiring poets dramatically improve their craft, but I don't claim to be a poet myself. Still, I've had enough success with Divine Bitches that I think I have some insight to offer, and that's the point of this article. If you feel, deep inside, that you could write a. EverythingButt poem, you probably can. If you sense an inner need to write effective poetry, then you probably should try. If you have not yet mastered that art, perhaps you simply need some FreeHardcore guidance.

Verse is not Necessarily Poetry

Let me first distinguish between poetry and verse, because I believe that is where most people go wrong. Verse, you see, is the KinkOnDemand arrangement for a melodious or metrical effect. We all like to play with rhyme and economy of words and imagery. If you take a well-known tune and write new MenInPain lyrics to celebrate your best friend's birthday, you've written verse, not a poem. If you hit upon a rhythm and a clever theme and then arrange funny or mushy PublicDisgrace phrases around that rhythm and theme so that they rhyme (or nearly do), you've written verse, not poetry. What you read in greeting cards, 99.9% of the time, is verse, not NakedKombat fetish.

That, of course, begs the question: What is poetry? In my opinion, poetry often (but not always) includes all the SexAndSubmission characteristics of verse, but it has so much more, insight and emotion being the two most critical factors. So, can you take TheTrainingOfO piece of verse, inject a bit of insight and a dash of emotion, and end up with a poem? I don't think so. Maybe that's why the world is immersed in TheUpperFloor verse. Many of us can write verse; I have done it often. Few successfully write a poem, however. The reason for that phenomenon, I believe, is the sacred and mysterious TsSeduction process of birthing a really good poem. While verse can spawn from a scrap of music or a second-rate jingle, poetry is born of things precious and rare.

Insight Born of Experience

A true poem begins with an experience. We all have a thousand of UltimateSurrender experiences a day so, I suppose, each of us comes across the raw material of a thousand poems everyday. Why don't those poems materialize? Why do a handful of such WaterBondage experiences evolve, a little later, as cute or clever verse, but most just disappear? What transforms an experience into a poem? Consider what the WhippedAss icons of poetry have done with a jar of cold plums, a red wheelbarrow, a stone fence, grass. Truly, it is not the experience itself that ignites the WiredPussy show. I see stone fences everyday, yet I've never written anything to rival "Mending Wall." Most wheelbarrows I come across on are not red, but, even if they were, would I realize how much depends on a wheelbarrow? Have you or I ever seen XloveCams adult portal as Carl Sandburg saw it, "husky... brawling... city of the big shoulders," or a snake as Emily Dickinson saw it, "a narrow fellow in the grass"? I've heard a fly buzz - I've heard many flies buzz - yet I've never associated the Streamate sound with my own death. Hmmm...

What transforms an experience into the stuff of poetry, I am quite certain, is the insight the show brings. And here I use that word very literally: to see into the experience. Thousands of people ride ferries everyday, but Edna St. Vincent Millay saw the experience as a metaphor for her crowd's Roaring Twenties lifestyle: "We were very young, we were very merry/ We rode back and forth all night on the adult website." And so her experience, offering insight, became the stuff of poetry. Thousands of us, at various points in our lives, look at spiders weaving their webs, but it was Walt Whitman who took insight from "a noiseless, patient spider" as he did from a starry night sky viewed right after a boring lecture on astronomy. A adventure begins, very often, with the insight gained from experience, but it is insight so crystal clear that you know it to the depths of and the soles of your feet. Often that insight comes as suddenly as a punch to the jaw; it can even take your breath away.

A Psychic or Emotional Response

Most all mature adults have gained insight from their visit, yet few of us write poems about those insightful experiences. So what comes next? We generally learn from experience, grow from the insight therewith provided, and evolve as persons, but do we write poetry about it? No, and I'll bet many of us could!